Survey Reveals High Usage of Unlicensed Cannabinoids Among Danish Dog Owners

Survey Reveals High Usage of Unlicensed Cannabinoids Among Danish Dog Owners

A recent survey conducted in Denmark has shed light on the widespread use of unlicensed cannabinoids among dog owners. The study, led by Pernille Holst and her team at the University of Copenhagen, found that 38% of dog owners surveyed reported using cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol (CBD), to treat their pets. These findings were published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

While cannabis-based products have gained popularity for medical and recreational use in humans, their use for pets remains controversial. In countries where cannabis is not legally prescribed for veterinary use, pet owners are turning to unlicensed cannabinoids to address various health issues.

The survey, conducted anonymously through social media platforms, received responses from 2,002 dog owners. Of these respondents, 38% reported using at least one cannabinoid product for their dogs. CBD drops or oils were the most commonly used, with 93% of dog owners opting for this form of treatment. Only 4% of owners reported using products containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

The survey revealed a wide range of reasons for using cannabinoids in dogs. Dog owners reported using them for pain management, behavioral issues, allergies, and various other conditions. The majority of respondents (77%) claimed to have witnessed a positive effect on their dogs’ mental or physical health after cannabinoid treatment.

However, the researchers caution that these findings are based on self-reported data and lack support from existing scientific studies on the subject. They emphasize the need for evidence-based research to better understand the potential benefits and risks of cannabinoid use in pets.

Holst and her team were particularly surprised by the diverse range of conditions for which Danish dog owners used these unlicensed products. This highlights the importance of conducting systematic clinical studies to determine the efficacy and safety of cannabinoids in treating different health issues in dogs.

In conclusion, the survey findings reveal a significant prevalence of unlicensed cannabinoid use among Danish dog owners. While many owners believe in the positive effects of these treatments, further scientific research is necessary to validate these claims and provide evidence-based guidance for pet owners.

FAQ Section:

1. What percentage of dog owners surveyed reported using cannabinoids to treat their pets?
38% of dog owners surveyed reported using cannabinoids, such as CBD, to treat their pets.

2. What type of cannabinoid product was most commonly used by dog owners?
CBD drops or oils were the most commonly used cannabinoid products by dog owners, with 93% of them opting for this form of treatment.

3. What percentage of dog owners reported using products containing THC?
Only 4% of dog owners reported using products containing THC.

4. What were the main reasons for using cannabinoids in dogs?
Dog owners reported using cannabinoids in dogs for various reasons, including pain management, behavioral issues, allergies, and other conditions.

5. What percentage of respondents claimed to have witnessed positive effects on their dogs’ health after cannabinoid treatment?
77% of respondents claimed to have witnessed a positive effect on their dogs’ mental or physical health after cannabinoid treatment.

Key Terms/Jargon:

– Cannabinoids: Compounds found in the cannabis plant that have various effects on the body.
– Cannabidiol (CBD): A non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in cannabis.
– Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC): The psychoactive cannabinoid in cannabis responsible for the “high” feeling.
– Efficacy: The effectiveness or ability of a treatment to produce the desired result.

Suggested Related Links:
PLOS ONE – The open-access journal where the study findings were published.
University of Copenhagen – The institution where the research was conducted.